Jackie

I. What is your moral issue?
Is drinking with the intention of getting drunk moral?
II. Awareness/Look for the Facts, Imagine Possibilities
a. What facts are important for your decision making? (What facts did your group find that are important to know in making your decision. List the most important – at least 3-5 - and explain why they are important.)
· Research has also shown that youth who use alcohol before age 15 are five times more likely to become alcohol dependent than adults who begin drinking at age 21. This is important because it shows how many alcoholics came to be possibly by drinking under the legal age which is immoral which helps in my decision.
· 1,700 college students die per year from alcohol-related unintentional injuries. This also shows how alcohol could lead to immoral decisions such as feeling they are more free or dangerous or immune to injuries when really they are not and they get hurt.
· Alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease, regardless of the type of beverage, the quantity consumed per drinking day, whether or not it was consumed with meals or the type of coronary outcome. This is important because it shows a positive outcome of drinking. It shows that it can be moral by benefiting your health.

b. What are all the possible decisions you could make regarding this issue (even the negative ones)?
· Are you drinking just to get drunk?
· Do you drink before you are 21?
· Do you drink a lot or a little?
· Do you drink wine once a week?
· Or are you drinking beer every day?
· Do you drink by yourself or only with a social group?

c. Who will be affected? Is the person doing the action important to your decision?
· The person that will be affected is anyone who drinks. It could also affect the family or friends of the person who drinks because if that person decides to drive home, they could harm the passengers in that car. It could affect their family because if the person is an alcoholic the family could have problems in communication which could potentially ruin a family.
· No the person doing the action is not really important to my decision because it doesn’t matter who drinks it.
d. What are consequences for possible decisions?
· If you are drinking just to get drunk, all consequences below are possible
· If you drink before you are 21, you could get your license revoked or thrown in jail
· If you drink a lot you could actually die from too much alcohol in a short period of time in which you need to get your stomach pumped
· If you drink a little or a medium amount you could still be conscious enough to do dangerous things or walk away without knowing it, or maybe doing something that you are going to regret the next day.
· Drinking wine once a week is healthy for your heart but drinking beer every day can have serious side effects or long – term health problems
· If you drink by yourself and something happens to you, no one will be there to help you and you could potentially die from that also.
· If a person drinks with a social group, they could potentially embarrass themselves or other people including their family. They could hurt someone or ruin relationships in that one night that could never be fixed.
e. What motives and intentions are important to consider?
· Is this person drinking with only the intention of getting drunk?
· Does this person have ulterior motives that could potentially be dangerous?
· Is this person drinking because of peer pressure or because they want to do it.
f. Are the methods used or the means to the goal important to consider?
· Yes, the methods, meaning forms of alcohol, are important because even though drinking a glass of wine is the same amount of alcohol as a shot of liquor or whiskey, if you drink bottles of them both the effects will be much different so the method of drinking could be vital to the person’s life in whether they could potentially live or die from it
· The means to the goal, meaning getting drunk, is also important to consider because if they are getting peer pressured into drinking than that is wrong and they shouldn’t pay the consequences for that but if they want to get drunk and know they will have to pay the consequences then it is their responsibility.
g. What circumstances are worth considering?
· how old the person is, their size and weight; if they are legal to drink
· the gender of the person
· what kind of alcohol they are drinking
· how many times a week they drink this alcohol
· how tolerant the person is to alcohol
· what their reputation is on drinking; how they act when they are drunk( happy, hostile, dangerous, angry, quiet)

III. Development/Seek Insight Beyond Your Own, Turn Inward
a. What value did your articles and/or interviews have in helping you understand your issue? What comments influenced you the most? Did the Church view help in any way?
· The values my articles had was really seeing actual percentages and knowing that this is a big problem in the world and seeing the effects it has on some people.
· My interviewees were sort of helpful in confirming that yes more people drink in college and why and also their thoughts on the proper age of drinking and health effects and what they believe.
· The comments that influenced me the most were that Laura said alcohol has a positive health effect which kills off weak brain cells which I’m not sure if it is true or not but it made me think. Another comment would be in the article when it said drinking frequently is more effective because that alcohol will wear off as it is short-term. In this way, each time it wears off, you can drink again which is the greatest benefit in helping to fight against this coronary disease.
· The Church view helped me to know that what the catechism says to do is to abstain from all alcohol as it could hurt others and the person drinking it which is vital to my point.
b. What are pertinent laws or moral principles?
· Pertinent laws are: if you are drinking and driving,
· if you are drinking under the age of 21
· if a minor is intoxicated, purchasing alcohol, misrepresentation of age, or attempting to purchase alcohol
· If you have opened alcohol in your car even if it wasn’t yours or if you weren’t drinking it.
· If you have someone else drinking in the car
· All of these laws suffer the consequences of: jail time, serious fines, community service, alcohol awareness classes, and license revocation.
c. How do your own personal experience and personal values help you in considering the issue?
· My family is a big drinking family who loves to party so my personal experiences with drinking are watching them a lot. This helps me to see what the effects of alcohol are and how it changes them when they are drunk as appose to sober.
· My personal values help me because my values include a right to life, as well as responsibility, and consequences of actions which point me in the direction of how drinking is bad for you.
IV. Judgment/Expect God’s Help, Name Your Decision
a. How might you pray about this issue? How does considering Jesus’ example and teaching (including the Beatitudes) affect your judgment? Does this tie in to topics we have studied in class (costly grace)?
· I would pray for people to drink responsibly and know when to stop. I would pray that they don’t try to drive home which could hurt people, and that they don’t hurt themselves.
· Considering Jesus’ example and teaching affects my judgment because his judgment would be to stay away from alcohol and save you from harm. In the bible, I think there was a parable of a woman who was an alcoholic and he healed her of her addictions and helped her. However in the beatitude give drink to the thirsty I don’t think he was including giving alcohol to the alcoholics.
· This could tie into cheap grace because maybe people who are alcoholics would know or think that drinking this much would be wrong but they believe God loves them anyway so He won’t be disappointed.
b. What is your decision? Write a paragraph which clearly states your judgment about the morality of your issue, giving reasons to support your issue. What values are lived out in the decision you have made?


My decision of is drinking to get drunk moral goes both ways. I believe if someone is drinking with a social group and having fun and partying and they get drunk or know they are going to get drunk, than that’s fine because there is nothing wrong with it. Yes it could lead to health issues and such but it doesn’t make it moral or immoral. Yes some people could die from overuse of alcohol on one night but I don’t believe they have an intention of dying that night. I don’t think that person goes out and thinks “I’m going to die of alcohol abuse tonight” but if they did think that, then it would be immoral. This is immoral because it’s a form of suicide. Killing yourself with no purpose is not what God’s plans for us entail. Alcohol also can lead someone into making immoral decisions. One such example could be when someone feels that they are dangerous and superior to others and that they are capable of pulling off stunts that are nearly impossible which results in serious injuries onto themselves. These stunts could consist of stupid ideas such as jumping from one thing to another or performing something ridiculous as well as a motorcycle or other vehicle accident because they were drunk and had less coordination and thinking on how to operate on one. Another immoral decision could be to kill someone because they are not thinking straight. They could embarrass themselves or family which would fall under the inconsiderate category making them unkind. They could rape someone or have unprotected sex resulting in unplanned pregnancies that they could potentially abort which makes that immoral. So many immoral situations could come out of the alcohol. So I believe the drinking itself is moral, but the decisions that could result from the alcohol have a strong potential to be immoral and most likely will be. By stating that the decisions caused by alcohol are immoral I am living out the value of the right to life. I am respecting the right to life because if unplanned pregnancies occur because of the drunkenness and they don’t want the baby, abortion could be possible. Also the right to life is appropriate because there are millions of people who get drunk and hurt themselves permanently or even kill themselves because of the decisions they made under the influence of alcohol. By calling drinking itself moral I am living out my value of acceptance in which I accept the fact that some people can’t handle not drinking, or they are alcoholics, or want to drink which I am fine with. By saying the decisions made because of alcohol are immoral I am also living out the value of self-control. These people cannot control themselves once they surrender to alcohol which represents a lack of self–control because someone else has to help them get better.





Mackenzie:


I. The issue is whether drinking alcohol is moral.
II. Awareness:
a. Facts:
i. A key fact is that alcohol consumption is linked to approx. 14,000 student deaths a year. This is an important fact in the decision making process because if you choose to drink, there is a risk that you could be one of the 14,000 deaths.
ii. Children of alcoholics are more likely to become addicted to alcohol when they grow up. This fact should also be in the back of your mind when making the decision to drink or not. One must realize the risk of becoming dependent on alcohol and realize that even if they develop an addiction and then overcome it, if they ever have a child, he or she will be affected.
iii. Alcohol is the number one date rape drug. If you are at a party and take a drink from a person, you must be aware that they could have drugged it. This possibility may and should have an impact on your decision to drink or not.
b. Possible Decisions:
i. In any situation you have the main decisions to drink or not drink.
ii. You could also decide to be a designated driver and keep an eye out for your friends.
iii. You could choose to influence your friends to not drink, or drink.
iv. You could choose to drink and drive, or drink and then call a cab or get a ride with someone else.
c. Who’s affected:
i. The person most directly affected by your choice to drink is you. However, if you chose to drink and then drive, everyone on the road and in your car is at risk. The people with whom you interact after drinking are affected.
d. Consequences:
i. If you chose to drink then drive a possible consequence could be a car accident and potentially death.
ii. A common consequence of drinking is a hangover.
iii. If you chose not to drink, you would be in a better frame of mind and happier (alcohol is a depressant). Also, you would be in a better position to help those around you.
e. Motives & Intentions:
i. Possible motives for drinking would be for fun, to feel better about yourself, for ‘liquid courage’, because everyone else is, to be cool, to get drunk, because you like wine or beer or liquor.
ii. Possible motives for not drinking could be: you don’t like alcohol, you don’t like the after effects of drinking, you feel better about yourself when choosing not to drink, because you are afraid of possible consequences of drinking, you know you’ll get in trouble.
f. I think the method of drinking is only important when it is illegal.
g. Circumstances:
i. Important circumstances that are important leading up to a decision to drink or not are: what happened to the person during the day or recently, are either of their parents alcoholics, are they addicted to alcohol, are all of their friends drinking, will they be driving later, have they ever had a drinking related accident, or have they been pressured to drink.
III. Seek Insight:
a. The articles I looked at and my interviews helped me better understand the subject. My interview with my brother especially was helpful because it helped me understand why it’s so easy to drink in college as well as how most college students view the subject on drinking.
b. The laws regarding drinking are that you must be 21 to purchase or consume alcohol and that if you are driving with a 0.08 or high BAC you will get a DUI.
c. My own personal experiences of seeing how people act drunk, as well as hearing about drunk driving accidents has affected how I consider the issue. I have realized that I would not want to embarrass myself while drunk, or be a mean drunk. Also, I would have a large fear of driving after drinking since I know how dangerous that can be.
IV.
a. When praying on this issue, I would ask God to help me make the best choice in the situation. I would also ask for help in handling any peer pressure that I may be under and that if I ever chose to drink, that I would have the grace to be responsible about it.
b. My decision on the topic of drinking is to not drink underage. However, I think that if you are of age, drinking is okay as long as you act responsibly. This also pertains to drinking in college. I would never recommend or feel good about college drinking, but if someone ever did, I guess it would be okay as long as they act responsibly. The main things that affected my decision were facts. The number of deaths a year due to alcohol has really opened my eyes to its negative effects. Also, I don’t think using an excuse like “I had a really bad day” to justify drinking is making it ok. However, there seems to be no problem with a group of 25 year olds going out for a drink or two. Although circumstances can affect a person’s decision to drink, I don’t think that it should influence them to drink (mainly in high school students). One may be in a situation where they feel a lot of peer pressure, but I don’t think that should ever be a reason to give in and drink. When making this decision, I am living out the values of self-respect and responsibility. Self-respect is shown by not drinking too much and keeping your body healthy, but it is also shown if you say ‘no’ to any peer pressure someone in high school like me, may feel. Responsibility is acted out if you choose drink and handle yourself in a safe and cautionary manner.



Emma:
I. What is your moral issue?
Underage drinking
II. Awareness/Look for the Facts, Imagine Possibilities
a. What facts are important for your decision making?
- 74.3% of high school students have had one or more drinks in their life
- research has shown that children of alcoholics may have small brain differences which could lead to alcohol problems
- 11% of eighth graders 22% of tenth graders and 29% of 12th graders have engaged in binge drinking in the past week
b. What are all the possible decisions you could make regarding this issue?
- You could be drinking to fit in with your friends
- You could be drinking to get drunk and have more fun
- You could simply say no to drinking
- You could be driving home after drinking
- You could be drinking very often and damaging your health
- You would be drinking under the legal limit
- You could say no to drinking and encourage others to do the same or offer to help the intoxicated people to return home
c. Who will be affected? Is the person doing the action important to your decision?
- The people surrounding any underage person who drinks could all possibly be affected by their drinking.
- Yes the person drinking underage is important because if it is someone more important and close to you your decisions may be different.
d. What are consequences for possible decisions?
- If you are drinking to fit in with your friends you could possibly end up doing something you regret
- Health issues may follow
- It is very easy to get injured if you are driving or in a car with someone who is intoxicated
- If you help someone who is involved with drinking stop you could help save them from a terrible fate
- If you start drinking to early in life it is easy to see alcohol as a comfort or way to feel relieved
e. What motives and intentions are important to consider?
- You should make sure you are not just drinking to look cool in front of your friends
- You should not be motivated to drink because you think it makes you cool
- Are you drinking because you think it will create a good time?
- Are you planning on getting drunk to use it as an excuse for doing anything that might happen to you while under the influence
f. Are the methods used or the means to the goal important to consider?
- Yes, if you are having a few small drinks with your friends whil casually sitting around a fire and you are over age 21 that is acceptable, but if you are getting alcohol through a club or if you are obtaining it illegally by having someone older buy it for you, then those means of getting alcohol should be considered
g. What circumstances are worth considering?
- The amount of alcohol a person intakes
- How much alcohol their body can handle
- If the location where they are drinking is potentially dangerous
- The affects drinking has on them and how tolerant they are of alcohol

III. Development/Seek Insight Beyond Your Own, Turn Inward
a. What value did your articles and/or interviews have in helping you understand your issue? What comments influenced you the most? Did the Church view help in any way?
- My articles and interviews really helped me see that underage is a larger issue than it is said to be and that the issue has been around for a while
- I was most influenced hearing that so many deaths happened due to drinking. I was also influenced by when my parents mentioned that they do not feel that underage drinking is getting worse over the years because that makes me feel a small ray of hope that maybe there is an effective way to end this.
b. What are pertinent laws or moral principles?
- I think that moral principals are more pertinent because the law is to easily bent or avoided and even though there is some uncertainty in moral principles for the most part the moral standings on an issue are concrete
c. How do your own personal experience and personal values help you in considering the issue?
- If you have had some bad experiences with alcohol they can help you make a good decision
- If one feels very strongly about something they must establish it as a belief to help them stay strong willed when an issue with that belief presents itself
IV. Judgment/Expect God’s Help, Name Your Decision
a. How might you pray about this issue? How does considering Jesus’ example and teaching (including the Beatitudes) affect your judgment? Does this tie in to topics we have studied in class (costly grace)?
- I would pray for all of the children that have grown up around drinking and hope that they can avoid any problems with drinking
- If we follow Jesus’ example we will be encouraged to do what is right and avoid putting people in harms that do not need to be
- People who drink excessively act with cheap grace because they are not respecting the Grace God has given them.
b. What is your decision? Write a paragraph which clearly states your judgment about the morality of your issue, giving reasons to support your issue. What values are lived out in the decision you have made?
- I have decided that underage drinking is an immoral issue because it is clearly stated as against the law. Teenagers should not be ruining their lives by drinking underage. If they ever got caught drinking many terrible things could happen to them; they could get their license taken away or it could do permanent damage to their record. Most teenagers do not realize the terrible actions that alcohol can lead them to doing and they do not realize that they could end up doing something they will regret. God does not want teenagers to put themselves in a position of danger by harming both their bodies and their minds while under the influence.