This is the page for summaries on the moral issue of immigration

Lauren K's Summary:

I. What is your moral issue? What is the big moral question that your group has been contemplating?
Is it morally acceptable for people to immigrate?
II.
Awareness/Look for the Facts, Imagine Possibilities
1. What facts are important for your decision making? (What facts did your group find that are important to know in making your decision. List the most important – at least 3-5 - and explain why they are important.)
o In a recent study, there are 11.9 million illegal immigrants in the United States; Or about 4% of the population: This fact is important because you should know how many other immigrates-illegal or not-are living in the country that you are considering immigrating to.
o Approximately 75% of America's immigrants are Latino: This fact is important because you should know who other ethnic groups are living in a specific country.
o The city of Dearborn, Michigan has the greatest population of Islamic immigrants than in any other country besides the Middle East: This fact is important because you should know what city or state in your chosen country has the highest population of immigrants.
o Households run by illegal aliens inflicted more than $26.3 million in costs on the federal government in 2002:This is important because you should know what kind of debt your chosen country is in, and how much of it is attributed to illegal immigration.
2. What are all the possible decisions you could make regarding this issue (even the negative ones)?

o Visit the country you’re planning to immigrate to before actually moving there to see if you like it
o Immigrate to the country but don’t become a legal citizen
o Visit the country and decide that it wouldn’t be a good decision to immigrate there
o Bring your family to the new country and only make your children become citizens
3. Who will be affected? Is the person doing the action important to your decision?

o Your family would be affected if you didn’t all immigrate to another country
o The country that you decide to immigrate to would be affected if you didn’t become a legal citizen (which would cost them money)
4. What are consequences for possible decisions?

o Doing something illegal
o Possibly putting you and your family in legal danger
5. What motives and intentions are important to consider?

o Not knowing the laws of a new country
o Not being accustomed to the way things are done in a new country
o Not wanting to pay the high costs of taxes along with other living expenses
6. Are the methods used or the means to the goal important to consider?
Yes because if a person comes into the country illegally and doesn’t intent on becoming a citizen then the goal really isn’t achieved because it was done under ulterior motives. But if a person comes into the country legally and intends on becoming a citizen then the goal is achieved because they did it the honest way.
7. What circumstances are worth considering?

o If the country that the person is immigrating from is in financial or economical strife
o If the person is going to immigrate illegally
o If the person intends on not paying their taxes or becoming a legal citizen once they immigrate
III.
Development/Seek Insight Beyond Your Own, Turn Inward
1. What value did your articles and/or interviews have in helping you understand your issue? What comments influenced you the most? Did the Church view help in any way?
It helped me see the issue of immigration and what people think about it from different points of view. When I asked my dad about what he though God would think about immigration and he said “Who can know the mind of God?”
2. What are pertinent laws or moral principles?
Pertinent laws would be that if you immigrate to another country you must become a legal citizen and you must pay taxes. However, most people who immigrate do not follow this.
3. How do your own personal experience and personal values help you in considering the issue?
In my opinion, I don’t see immigration as being wrong or morally unjust. If a person, living in their homeland, feels unsafe or wants better living conditions then I feel that they should have the right to live wherever they deem acceptable. My great-grandfather was an immigrant from Mexico and although he didn’t stay here, I don’t feel that it’s something wrong.
IV. Judgment/Expect God’s Help, Name Your Decision
1. How might you pray about this issue? How does considering Jesus’ example and teaching (including the Beatitudes) affect your judgment? Does this tie in to topics we have studied in class (costly grace)?
I would pray to God and ask him to help me make a wise decision on whether I should immigrate or not. A verse in the Beatitudes that says “blessed are they that suffer persecution for justice’ sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven” might be uplifting for immigrants because if they’re being persecuted in their homeland, that God will take care of them.
2. What is your decision? (Arrive at an answer for that big moral question.) Write a paragraph which clearly states your judgment about the morality of your issue, giving reasons to support your issue. What values are lived out in the decision you have made?
My decision is that immigration is morally acceptable. I feel that it’s morally acceptable because I don’t believe that God would ever not want His people to be happy. And if they’re homeland is possibly causing them harm or it isn’t safe, then I believe that he would want them to find somewhere else to live where they felt safe.


Jillian's summary:


I. What is your moral issue? What is the big moral question that your group has been contemplating?
· Our group’s moral issue is immigration.
· 1. Is it morally acceptable for people to immigrate?
2. What responsibility comes with illegal immigration for the country, government, and the immigrants themselves?
II. Awareness/Look for the Facts, Imagine Possibilities
1. What facts are important for your decision making? (What facts did your group find that are important to know in making your decision. List the most important – at least 3-5 - and explain why they are important.)

· Immigrant workers make up a larger share of the U.S. labor force: This is important because it shows that immigrants take jobs from already citizens.
· By the early 1990s, an estimated 3 to 4 million illegal foreign-born residents were also present in this country: This shows that there are many immigrants that are illegally in the U.S. so we have to try to keep the U.S. safe.
· The first immigration law in the United States, passed in 1864, was actually intended to encourage immigration by making the process easier by assisting in transportation and settlement: This is important because it shows that it is not too hard to become a U.S. citizen.
· Studies have shown that more than 50 percent of children have an undiagnosed condition that is only found on arrival in this country: This shows that we have to be careful of what diseases are being brought to the U.S. through immigrants.
2. What are all the possible decisions you could make regarding this issue (even the negative ones)?

· Positive for the first question: Yes, It is moral to immigrant if the proper steps are taken.
· Negative for the first question: No, We shouldn’t allow immigration because it lowers the safety of the U.S. citizens.
· Second question: The U.S. has to be aware of criminals that may be trying to enter or different unknown diseases. The U.S. also has to look at how many are being allowed into the U.S. because they may end up taking too many of the citizens jobs.
3. Who will be affected? Is the person doing the action important to your decision?

· All of society is affected. The person who is doing the action (the immigrant) is very important while making a decision because a decision depends on the life style and personality of the immigrant.
4. What are consequences for possible decisions?

· If we decide that it is moral for immigrants to come here than we lower the safety of the U.S. citizens.
· If we decide that it is immoral than we will never get a variety of people in the U.S. and therefore will not get to experience other cultures.
· If the government, country and immigrants don’t show responsibility during immigration then the proper precautions won’t be taken.
5. What motives and intentions are important to consider?

· The immigrant’s intentions for coming to the U.S. Like whether they are coming for a job, health care, family, ext.
· The motives of the government and country. Like are they trying to keep the country safe or do they just not want immigrants to enter the country.
6. Are the methods used or the means to the goal important to consider?

· Yes the methods to becoming an immigrant need to be a perfect even. Not too difficult because we want to prevent more illegal immigrants and not too easy because we still have to be careful of who is entering the country.
7. What circumstances are worth considering?

· The circumstances that need to be considered are
o Who is the immigrant
o What is their background
o What is the reason for entering the U.S.
o Do they have family who are previous immigrants
o Have that gotten in trouble with the law
III. Development/Seek Insight Beyond Your Own, Turn Inward
1. What value did your articles and/or interviews have in helping you understand your issue? What comments influenced you the most? Did the Church view help in any way?

· My articles gave me a lot of facts and statistics that allowed me to make a choice not only based on my own opinion but also the facts from my articles.
·
The comments that influenced me the most were the statistics that showed how many jobs are being taken, how many new diseases are let into the country, and how many immigrants come over.
·
The church opinion didn’t really help with my decision all that much although it did help to give me the Christian perspective on immigration.
2. What are pertinent laws or moral principles?

· We should treat everyone equally. We need to keep the country safe. We should be welcoming to other cultures and races.
3. How do your own personal experience and personal values help you in considering the issue?

· Visiting other countries has helped me to see how different they are and how just like I went to their countries they might like to come to ours.
IV. Judgment/Expect God’s Help, Name Your Decision
1. How might you pray about this issue? How does considering Jesus’ example and teaching (including the Beatitudes) affect your judgment? Does this tie in to topics we have studied in class (costly grace)?

· I might pray that God could help me be welcoming to others. That he could give guidance to the government while they make decisions about immigration.
·
Considering Jesus’ example and teaching allows me to have a Christian view on immigration to help me make the best decision I can.
· This ties into the topic of cheap grace because we think that if we are hard on immigrants, then we can just tell God that we will do better later. We need to be welcoming to immigrants because it is the right thing to do. We just need to be careful while letting them over here.
2. What is your decision? (Arrive at an answer for that big moral question.) Write a paragraph which clearly states your judgment about the morality of your issue, giving reasons to support your issue. What values are lived out in the decision you have made?

· My decision is immigration is morally acceptable as long as the proper steps have been taken. Illegal immigration is immoral. The immigrant must become a citizen legally. The immigrant may come here for medical reasons but must return home if they do not want to become a citizen properly. Immigrants should be equal with the rest of the citizens. They should not be given a job just to meet quotas. They should not have any unknown diseases for the protection of the U.S. Immigrants should not be looked down upon and should actually be welcomed by society.

Alexa's Summary


I. Immigration
1. Is it morally acceptable for people to immigrate?
2. What responsibility comes with illegal immigration for the country, government, and the immigrants themselves?
II. Awareness/Look for the Facts, Imagine Possibilities
1. The three sources for Catholic teaching on immigration are: the clear, strong biblical mandate on respect for the alien. The Church’s 2,000 years of experience in outreach to new races, cultures, and social classes. And the insights and merits of contemporary social science analyses on immigration. These facts are important and help with the answering our moral questions because they show what the Church thinks and feels about the teachings of immigration.
2. The possible decisions are: Immigrating from one country to another legally. Immigrating from one country to another illegally.
3. The people that would be affected would be myself, my family, my friends, and all those around me that I will be immigrating with, or immigrating to those near where I would live. Yes the person doing the action would be important to my decision.
4. The consequences are that if you immigrate legally, than you shouldn’t really have any consequences except they might just give you a hard time moving. But if you immigrate illegally, than you can get caught and thrown in to jail, and word will get to other countries that you aren’t allowed to be anywhere else. They might never let you leave.

5. Motives: The government might not want them there because of safety reasons, especially safety against terrorists so they really have to be careful about who they are letting into the country.
Intentions: The immigrant wants a better living for himself or herself and possibly for their family. Better jobs, housing, taxes, living, etc.

6. Yes they are important to consider, because it’s such a big process moving from one country to another that people need to consider all the possibilities.
7. The circumstances worth considering are: What will I have to go through to immigrate? What are the consequences of immigrating? If I’m immigrating illegally, what is the possibility of me getting caught and what will happen to me if I do?
III. Development/Seek Insight Beyond Your Own, Turn Inward
1. I already knew a lot about immigration because this generation of my whole family is the only ones who didn’t immigrate, so I kind of grew up about learning about all of it. The comments that influenced me the most were the ones that were saying how bad immigration is, because the more I saw that, the more it made me want to stand up for what I believe in, because if immigration was never allowed, I wouldn’t be in America right now. The Church view helped by pushing me even more into immigration because most of the time I think that whatever the Church says is mostly right, and this is something that I strongly agree with the Church on.
2. Moral principles are the morality that we’ve grown around and the principles we’ve been taught since day one and have followed unto today.
3. My personal experience and values is growing up and hearing all the stories of how my parents came to America and the saying most Chaldeans use is “We came straight off the boat.” I’ve known about immigration all my life, because without it I wouldn’t be here, I would be living in Iraq probably trying to stay alive because of the war there right now.
IV. Judgment/Expect God’s Help, Name Your Decision
1. I pray that people have the courage to immigrate and make a better living for themselves and that the government will continue to allow immigrants into our country. Jesus’ attitude affects my judgment because Jesus says “Blessed are the meek; for they shall possess the land.” This means to me that those who don’t have much but long for more are the ones who truly deserve the Kingdom of Heaven. Jesus would let people immigrate because He thinks that everyone deserves more than one chance, and He will always be willing to give that person another chance. This affects my judgment by not making being rude or making fun of those who don’t have much because they are the ones who truly deserves the world. Yes this does tie into something we’ve done it class, like costly grace, because costly grace is both God and you doing both parts, so if you want to immigrate and start a new life, you have to pull your part because God can’t do all of it for you.
2. My decision is yes it is morally acceptable for people to immigrate and the responsibility for the country and the government is knowing who is immigrating legally or illegally. And the responsibility of the immigrants is to make the right decision and just live with what they have and not do something so illegal that that person might end up in jail for. My judgment about the morality of my issue is that it is not wrong for people to immigrate, but it is wrong for them to immigrate illegally. It’s alright to immigrate legally because people deserve another chance in life to live a better life in a different country. It’s not alright to illegally immigrate because if you think of all the consequences that might happen, than it’s just not worth it. The values that are lived out in the decision I’ve made is the value of love and heart because if you truly love God, yourself, and you family, than you will do what’s right by following your heart and making a better living for you and them.

Brittany’s Summary
I. What is your moral issue? What is the big moral question that your group has been contemplating?
-Immigration is our issue and is about non-residents of a country migrating into the country to live. It is a moral issue because first of all it’s an illegal act and secondly it is a major source of population growth and cultural change and caused controversy regarding topics such as ethnicity, religion economic benefits, job growth, settlement patterns, and levels of criminality.
-1. Is it morally acceptable for people to immigrate?
2. What responsibility comes with illegal immigration for the country, government, and the immigrants themselves?
II. Awareness/Look for the Facts, Imagine Possibilities
1. What facts are important for your decision making? (What facts did your group find that are important to know in making your decision. List the most important – at least 3-5 - and explain why they are important.)

-More than 66% of all births in California are to illegal alien Mexicans on Medi-Cal, whose births were paid for by taxpayers. This is important because the legal citizens of the U.S are paying tax dollars that should be going to other legal citizens but also we have to remember that all life is valuable.
-12 Americans are murdered every day by illegal aliens. (that’s more than 21,900 murders by illegal aliens since September 11, 2001). This shows that having people come here illegally hurts our country physically.
-In 2006, 53.5% of immigrants in the U.S came from Mexico, 2% from North America, 13% from Europe, 27% from Asia, 4% from Africa, and .5% from Oceania. This is important to know because the places the people come from affects how they’re treated and how they affect us.
-People Immigrate for the following reasons: economic professional, political, persecution and oppression, including genocide and ethnic cleansing retirement (e.g., better weather; lower living costs). sentimental (e.g., the desire to settle in a country due to personal preference; family reunification). personal (e.g., opinion-based; love of another country)) The great majority of immigration occurs for economic reasons of one sort or another. It’s important to know why they’re here.
2. What are all the possible decisions you could make regarding this issue (even the negative ones)?
-Increase border security keeping people from immigrating into the country
- Give all illegal immigrants already living here citizenship
- Gather all immigrants and kick them out of our country
3. Who will be affected? Is the person doing the action important to your decision?
-immigrants:yes they are definitely important because the whole issue is about them and their lives, where they live, and how they’re treated.
- American citizens: affects us Economically, socially, culturally
4. What are consequences for possible decisions?
-For increasing border security, consequences are that people who need to come to the country to support their families for a better life aren’t going to be able to.
-For giving immigrants all citizenship, consequences is that it could upset the actual citizens and could throw the economy off balance.
-For kicking all immigrants out, consequences would be that several families and people get hurt emotionally and financially in the process.
5. What motives and intentions are important to consider?
- It’s important to consider the fact that people who immigrate do it for a reason, whether it be to feed their family, start a new life, or better opportunities.
6. Are the methods used or the means to the goal important to consider?
- Yes, the means to the goal of the government is to make a better country for the citizens and that’s one of their top priorities.
7. What circumstances are worth considering?
- Major circumstances worth considering are the fact that people (meaning all men, women, and children!!) if caught being an illegal immigrant can be sent to a kind of jail or detention center as if they’re in the country as a criminal who’s actually committed a major crime.

III. Development/Seek Insight Beyond Your Own, Turn Inward
1. What value did your articles and/or interviews have in helping you understand your issue? What comments influenced you the most? Did the Church view help in any way?

My article made a very clear point that I hadn’t even thought about until I read it. It was the fact that America is the melting pot and that all of us, our families, immigrated here at one point in time for some of the same reasons that immigrants today want to come live here so I think that is sort of hypocritical of us. The church view helped a lot and this one passage stood out to me “Thus they are forced to flee our state. I believe that the right to earn one’s living and the right to shelter one’s family securely are basic human rights, the fundamental building blocks of a just society, and to deny these rights is immoral and unjust.”
2. What are pertinent laws or moral principles?
- The moral principles in this situation are that mostly innocent human lives are getting punished for wanting a better life and not being aloud a citizenship. Hurting people, both immigrants and citizens. Denying human rights.
3. How do your own personal experience and personal values help you in considering the issue?
- My own personal experience is that I’ve known families who have been on a green card who when they had to leave it was a terrible time and experience for them because they had a life here and they just had to pick up and leave into worse conditions, worse shelter, worse financial situation, worse life. This helps me consider the effects on the immigrants and how hurt they must feel to be kicked out.
IV. Judgment/Expect God’s Help, Name Your Decision
1. How might you pray about this issue? How does considering Jesus’ example and teaching (including the Beatitudes) affect your judgment? Does this tie in to topics we have studied in class (costly grace)?

- I would pray that the government can find a way to just make it work. To be able to make everyone happy or at least give everyone our basic human rights. Jesus’ example and teachings definitely affect my judgment because it helps me understand that the immigrants are human, not criminal people, but people like you and me that need help. It does tie into costly grace because we can’t sit around and think that we can push immigrants around like that, go to church every Sunday, and all is forgiven, we need to take action to help these people instead of kicking them away.
2. What is your decision? (Arrive at an answer for that big moral question.) Write a paragraph which clearly states your judgment about the morality of your issue, giving reasons to support your issue. What values are lived out in the decision you have made?
- My decision is that yes it is morally acceptable for immigrants to immigrate and all immigrants who already have lives in the United States should be given citizenship. I chose this because it’s the only thing that makes sense to me. Kicking people out of the country who already live here and have family, friends, and a job here seems unfair. And increasing security at the border is just another way to keep more immigrants out without taking care of the ones inside the country first. At a certain point time you will need to increase the border security because we now have tons of citizens but you have to deal with the ones living here already before you try keeping more out. A reason I chose this is because of the fact that we were all immigrants at one point and should show some empathy, and also the church teachings agree that it’s just not right to take away peoples basic rights. The values that I am living out are the compassion for human dignity and human rights.